Makerspace at University of La Verne accepts two health pathway students.

Maya Dessai waits for the 3D printer to make a portion of her robot. 

Maya Dessai waits for the 3D printer to make a portion of her robot. 

We could hardly contain our excitement when we heard that Chino Hills High School health pathway students Maya Desai and Hana Roble were accepted into this prestigious program at the university's Wilson Library. Born out of a grassroots effort, the Makerspace program has already hosted a Mini Maker Fair in May of last year and began a summer intership program with the ULV's iGEM students that opened its door to motivated high school students. For those unfamiliar with Makerspace, it is technology phenomenon that incorporates electronics equipment, digital fabrication tools, virtual reality technology, and high end computer design software in a laboratory environment that promotes creativity, tinkering, and hacking as a way to create new things. This "outside the box" environment let's students follow their imaginations. 

Hana Roble uses high tech software to help her create her Magic Mirror. 

Hana Roble uses high tech software to help her create her Magic Mirror. 

Maya and Hana have already learned how to use the lab's 3D printer, laser cutter, the Raspberry Pi program, and other tools to design the projects of their choice. But to help them get their feet wet, they started with a ULV keychain and phone case. Maya is creating a robot while Hana is creating a "magic mirror" which is essentially a household mirror that's being "teched" out. It reflects the weather, date, time and inspirational messages! 

Outreach Specialist, Sonia Ventura checked in with the two young ladies to ask about their experience at Makerspace. 

Sonia: Which class in high school has helped you for you internship with Makerspace?
Maya: Math! Using lots of numbers for the programing codes and dimensions of the projects.
Sonia: How will the Makerspace internship help you in your career as a medical professional?
Maya: Makerspace has helped me by discovering new techniques to help design and create items such as prosthetics.
Hana: Makerspace has helped me to better understand technology and its importance in the health field.

Both Hana and Maya hope to one day create and design technology that will assist health professionals. We think they're off to a great start. 

HOT student wins WIOA branding contest.

Last May, the Workforce Development Department (WDD) announced a branding contest for its WIOA (Work Innovation and Opportunity Act) program to allow WIOA youth program"to start marketing itself as a world class youth program" under one name.  Four of our HOT youth, Shuvette MarshallStephanie PinedaNeery Velasquez, and Julissa Ponce all decided to enter. We are pleased to announce the Neery Velasquez was the winner of the contest with "Generation Go!" which, he explained, stands for "just go for whatever your heart desires."  In a recent communication, the WDD expressed their agreement.

 “Generation: Go! Is being recommended because it reflects the energy of our youth and the dynamic services and supports provided by our contract partners that will ready our youth for exciting work and career opportunities.

Generation: Go! is a versatile branding name that lends itself to exciting slogans and marketing tie-ins such as ‘Powered by San Bernardino County Workforce Development Board’ and ‘Ready, Set, Go!’ which communicate the energy and excitement of our developing world-class youth program.” 

The award was accepted by Jorge De Leon, IHPC Outreach Specialist for the HOT program, on behalf of Neery, who received a small gift and a certificate of recognition. We are looking forward to the future success of all WIOA participants and congratulate Neery and our HOT youth for taking this initiative in the program. Just go! We're with you all the way. 

Parktree staff praise LIFE students.

Thuy Ho with her onsite host, Vanessa Enriquez.

Thuy Ho with her onsite host, Vanessa Enriquez.

The LIFE program has continued to grow with a new cohort of students which began this summer. Two of those students are Thuy Ho and Francesca Barron who were placed at ParkTree Community Health Center in Ontario. Both students attend Chaffey Joint Union High School and will soon complet 60-80 hours of LIFE (Learning Inspired Field Experience) at ParkTree. 

We can't say enough how positive experience for both the students and the staff goes a long way in inspiring other community health agencies to get involved with LIFE! Every student in the program is thoroughly vetted through our extensive application and interview process. The LIFE coordinator insures that students are matched with the right organization to provide the most meaningful experience. Students are monitored and maintain a working journal of their experience, while completing workbook activities that help them get the most out of their time at the health faciltiy.  

The staff really appreciates all the help the students have been giving us. They are part of our ParkTree Community Health Center family now! [They have] positive attitudes and are always willing to help out! They have also been able to shadow in the back with our doctors and medical assistants.

ParkTree is committed to hosting LIFE students through out the entire summer. They see the future in these young adults and want to be a part of educating them on health careers while and heightening their awareness of health issues facing their communities today. The Inland Health Professions would like to thank Vanessa Enriquez, Outreach and Enrollment Specialist at ParkTree Community Health Center, and all the ParkTree staff for their contribution to the enrichment of these student's futures. 

My LIFE experience was very eye opening, I’ve learned so much and it helped me grow very positively. This program has given me opportunities to achieve many more goals [in the] future. I’m more confident and I’m always going to be prepared thanks to the amazing people at Reach Out! - Francesca Barron

Adrenaline junkies welcome!

Rialto Unified School District (RUSD) students got a little taste of the action during a special four-day 911 Health Careers Bootcamp hosted by IHPC in partnership with RUSD. The camp ran June 12th - 15th at the Rialto Adult School. IHPC has provided 911 Emergency Careers Bootcamps in the past with great response from students. The camp was very "hands on" with students learning how to immobilize and move victims at the scene of an accident using c-spine equipment, put on firefighting equipment, participate in interactive tours of emergency, firefighting and law enforcement vehicles, and outdoor survival techniques. 

She was so entertaining and lively, it made me think that I could actually be a travel nurse too! - student’s remark on Hannah Giboney’s talk

Students were surprised that the camp kicked off with a full morning of team building and communication exercises. In all emergency careers, being able to communicate quickly and effectively, and work well in a team is paramount. They began to see how important communication is to being able to help others in a variety of emergency situations. The Real Colors personality test also gave them insight into how they relate to the world and others. It was the perfect start to three action-packed days!

Students heard from some phenomenal guest speakers including ER travel nurse, Hannah Giboney, who shared hair-raising stories about working in Iraq in war-torn ISIS territory. Mark Oswood, who coordinates the outdoor wellness program at Cal State San Bernardino, taught wilderness first aid, outdoor survival, and exposed the students to careers involving wildnerness rescue. Students were given towels and ripped blankets which they they had to fashion into emergency neck braces and slings. Dr. Anthony Choi, brought a new perspective to applied science by explaining his career as a medical expert witness for court cases involving car accidents. He demonstrated how the use of science and physics helps him determine the probability and severity of injury in a motor vehicle accident. Through his talk students better understood the long term effects of an accident on the human body. 

This was an amazing program for anyone who may be interested in the medical and emergency field. It provides you with a lot of information and there are a lot of fun hands on activities.
Teresita Corona, Eisenhower Graduate

It was Lisa Comnick, a San Bernardino County paramedic/firefighter, and founder of the EMS Bootcamp held in Angelus Oaks, who brought her team in to run the emergency response aid and rescue mission drills. Students really got into the action when they were divided up into teams to rescue victims (other students) of a motor vehicle accident. The "car crash" simulation enabled the students to use their newfound team building skills to work together, manage obstacles in their path, and make a successful and safe rescue of their fellow students "trapped" in the jeep placed on the "scene".

The camp was rounded out by additional career presentations on firefighting, peace enforcement, emergency medical technicians, and paramedics. Each student received CPR certification and walked away with increased knowledge and interest in this exciting and challenging field. This program would not have been possible without the partnership of the following people and organizations:

  • Lisa Comnick, San Bernardino County Fire
  • Mark Oswood, Outdoor Wellness Program, CSUSB
  • Dr. Anothy Choi, Medical Expert Witness
  • Hannah Giboney, Loma Linda University
  • Rialto PD & CERT (Certified Emergency Response Team)
  • Rialto Fire Departmet
  • American Medical Response (CPR Certification)

Fontana freshmen kick off summer with health camp.

DNA extraction - all you need is a little fruit, detergent, a filter and a Ziplock bag!

DNA extraction - all you need is a little fruit, detergent, a filter and a Ziplock bag!

New high school freshman in the Fontana Unified School District received an unique opportunity to "jump start" the upcoming school year by participating in a two-week introduction to health professions. This summer bridge program (aka Health Occupations 101 Camp) ran from June 5 - 16 at Fontana High School.  Motivated in part by the chance to receive five elective high school credits for the program (how awesome is that!), the students responded in earnest with nearly 100 youth showing up on the first day! We soon captured these young hearts and minds with engaging activities, lectures, field trips, and yes, even a littlemorning exercise to get their minds pumping. 

We wanted to highlight a variety of careers, especially some of the lesser known ones amongst students (beyond becoming a doctor or a nurse), so every day of camp focused on a different health profession. We introduced mental health, pharmacy, dentistry, public health, allied health, and medicine, and packed the day with activities. There was never a dull moment as students extracted "DNA", carved teeth, and compounded "medicines". Field trips were arranged at two locations, thanks to our friends at American Medical Response (AMR) in Rancho Cucamonga and Premier Medical Transportation (PMT) in Colton. We also provided all the students soft skills training - imperative to their future success in any profession.

Students learn about compounding medications by creating their very own lip balm. 

Students learn about compounding medications by creating their very own lip balm. 

Marlene Ventura and David Muro from Valley Star Community Services, pop quiz students.

Marlene Ventura and David Muro from Valley Star Community Services, pop quiz students.

Our guest speakers also came from a variety of health-related facilities like Valley Star Community Services, Beaver Medical Group and Loma Linda University's Behavioral Medicine Center. Students also heard from our higher education partners like Chapman University, Western University of Health Sciences, and Loma Linda University's School of Dentistry.  Many were surprised to learn how they can deliver health-relataed services in the armed forces from Aeromedical Technician, Elizabeth Flores from the United States Air Force. 

This camp was the first one of its kind for the Fontana area and we were pleased at the student turnout and their responses to everything they learned. We want to recognize our partners, the Fontana Unified School District for making this summer bridge program possible. Funding was provided by the Career Technical Education Incentive Grant (CTEIG). 

LIFE students introduce health careers to the community.

Last week State Senator Connie M. Leya and Assemblymember Freddie Rodriguez, in partnership with the City of Pomona, Pomona Health Promoters, Western University College of Gaduate Nursing, and CareMore presented the Summer Passport to Health community event at Washington Park in Pomona. It was free to anyone who wanted to attend and provided health screenings, nutrition information community resources and a legislative update.

IHPC facilitated our Health Career Corner with our LIFE students as volunteers. Despite the heat, the students did such a great job demonstrating and leading the different activities at our table that one women commented "Wow, you're telling me these are high school students?! I thought they were college students!" Of course the highlight of the day was meeting the Senator who snapped a picture with the students.

All in all it was a good day and the students really appreciated the opportunity to serve their community.

...Thank you guys for inviting me join in this amazing event, in which I was fortunate enough to meet great people and learn so many new things. One thing that really touched me was the fact that I was able to literally reach out to the youth and other members of the community. I know with hard work, a kind heart, and greater knowledge obtained through college I can replicate what I did at that community event on a much larger scale, reaching out to people all over the world. Thank you again!
—Mark Nguyen

It's about LIFE!

I'm so glad we aren't talking about the cereal here! No. LIFE is actually short for Learning Inspired Field Experience - a comprehensive program that we rolled out in earnest this year to expose students to health professions. 

Pic L to R: Back Row: Doxa Kuate, Grecia Sepulveda, Ted Choi, Mark Nguyen, Julio Guzman. Front Row: Francesca Barron, Charmaine Donato, Leidi Bustos, Leah Serrano, Chase Yonamine, Zubair Ahmed. 

Pic L to R: Back Row: Doxa Kuate, Grecia Sepulveda, Ted Choi, Mark Nguyen, Julio Guzman. Front Row: Francesca Barron, Charmaine Donato, Leidi Bustos, Leah Serrano, Chase Yonamine, Zubair Ahmed. 

Look at those eager young faces! We had 11 high school students enter the LIFE (Learning Inspired Field Experience) program at the start of the summer break. They will be placed in a number of community clinics and medical offices like Parktree Community Health Center and Upland-Ontario Medical Clinic and Urgent Care. Some students will even complete their LIFE hours in private practice settings. 

The 8 hour of training is pretty comprehensive but these students were up to the task. After a review of the goals and objectives of the program, a number of training topics were covered including professionalism in the work place, confidentiality, HIPAA regulations, security, privacy, infection control, hazardous materials, and of course service excellence.   One student, Mark Nguyen had this to say about the training :

My first day of training was very informational; I learned so many new things. I appreciate the time you guys took to go through even one of the littlest but most significant gestures like the handshake... This program is definitely what I have been searching for! I know it will not only advance myself in my future career, but also improve how I am as a person. I am excited to see what is next in this amazing program, and as always, I will keep an open mind and always put my best foot forward. Thank you so much for taking time out of your day to be with us!
- Mark Nguyen, Colony HS, Ontario

Once placed, students will be closely monitored complete assignments along the way designed to help them get the most out of their experience. Each student left the training with a workbook and, like Mark, increased confidence! That's exactly what we want for these students because we know a first impression is a lasting one and this may be the first time a site has worked with students at this level. The success of the program lies in placing receptive, responsible, and motivated students eager to learn, with health professionals who want to be a part of the health education pipeline. These experiences shape lives and we can't wait to see where they go! Stay tuned...

We received emails from students expressing their gratitude for the training and had this to say:

“...You and your colleagues passion for public health and helping the community is evident and is very radiating. Thank you for sharing your passion and inspiring me and my peers.”

Benito Machado trains on the dos and don'ts of professional communication.

Benito Machado trains on the dos and don'ts of professional communication.

“...I am extremely excited to get...into the working environment. I am grateful for this opportunity that I am being given, and I am more than ready to demonstrate it as well! Thank you again.”

“I am very thankful for the opportunity you guys have given me to be able learn about the medical field. I am looking forward to be able to to work with you, with all the ReachOut workers, and the facility.”

“I was honored to attend the first training day... It was a great experience for me, coming out of that session learning a lot more about life and the interview process before coming. Thank you so much for having it and I can't wait to see what other opportunities LIFE has to offer.” - Zubair Ahmed, Los Osos High School

“I really enjoyed the contents, and definitely learned a lot, especially on privacy laws and mannerism. Probably my favorite part was having to go up in front of the audience and speak out loud introductions and presentations. Nerve wracking at the very least, but certainly enjoyable. I can definitely apply these lessons to my college career and interviews in the future.”

 

 

Where did the last decade go?

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Okay so if you've been reading the weekly update at all for the past several months, our 10th birthday, isn't news. But we had such a good time at our celebration we wanted to share! More than 90 people attended the gathering at Azusa Pacific University including students and their families. It was exciting to hear directly from these young people who benefit from the coalition's efforts. 

Yousef Samir, White Coat Alumnus from Yucaipa HS

Yousef Samir, White Coat Alumnus from Yucaipa HS

Youth from the student ambassador, White Coat, HOT, and LIFE programs came and shared how their experiences have given them direction and motivation to serve their communities through the healthcare. Juan Carlos Belliard, Director of the Institute for Community Partnerships at Loma Linda University and long-time supporter of the coalition, provided some remarks on the growth of IHPC.  Claudia Sanchez, from Pomona Adult School and Maurice Myers from Don Lugo High School, delighted guest as they recounted their experiences as "pupil" vs teacher during their externships. 

Carol Allbaugh, Director of IHPC poses with [L to R], Andy Serobyan, Shalon Watkins, Robert Coster from AMR, Rancho Cucamonga.

Carol Allbaugh, Director of IHPC poses with [L to R], Andy Serobyan, Shalon Watkins, Robert Coster from AMR, Rancho Cucamonga.

We also honored and recognized our Health Professions Conference sponsors, our IHPC Champion, American Medical Response, and nearly two hundred agencies, businesess, and individuals (represented by balloon cut outs on the walls) who work along side us to strengthen the health education pipeline. We were also able to raise another $297 towards the HOT scholarship program and awarded two worthy students $700 scholarships toward their eduction. Guests were moved as Neery Velazquez shared how much the HOT program has changed his life. Stephanie Pineda also received a scholarship at the event.

All the guest received a small take-home gift and a copy of the IHPC annual report, hot off the press!  It was a party, after all so we played a few games (a little friendly competition), ate cake, and got to know one another just a little bit better. We are humbled and honored to work with each and every one of you. The spirit of dedication and determination to make a difference in the southern california region could be felt. Thank you for 10 years. We look forward to the next decade! See event photos.

Students can "fly high" with a medical military career.

Select students from Canyon Springs High School were treated to the type of job shadow experience that only our military can provide. Our finest, dressed in military fatigues, put on their mentoring hats as students stepped into the bowls of a massive C-17 Globetrotter to observe (more like gawk in awe) how the 315th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron (AES) go about the job of evacuation, rescue, and administration of medical aid inside the huge flying machine.The C-17 is used around the world in response to natural disasters, support of combat missions, humanitarian aid and peacekeeping efforts.

Through out the day, which started at 6:30 AM, students watched as the crew performed their flight brief, loaded the aircraft, set up medical equipment, and prepared for simulated patients on stretchers. Anyone who has ever experienced a bumpy commerical flight knows that this type of career is not for the meek - imagine treating patients and handling medical emergencies inside a massive steel tank high above the skies and having to contend with changes in altitude and turbulance! The one-on-one experience enabled the students to speak to the pilots who run these missions and even grab a photo in the cockpit [see pic left]. It was first for the students as well as the crew who stated that they had never hosted students on the plane before! But the experience proved to be a posivite one and IHPC has been invited to bring students again next year! We'd like to give a special thank you to March Air Reserve Office of Public Affairs  and Colonel Monsita Faley, USAF, NC Commander, AES, for helping to provide this job shadow experience. 

Youth Mental Health First Aid offered by TriCity Wellness Services.

Youth Mental Health First Aid offered by Tri City Mental Health Services. Teen depression, suicide and other mental health issues have become a part of the national conversation. This was the motivation behind the first IHPC Youth Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training workshop for teens who want to better understand the issues, recognize the signs, and learn how to help friends or family who may be suffering. In fact, so many teens wanted to participate in the two-day course, that we had to offer a second date scheduled for later this summer. (Apply online). 

Teen depression, suicide and other mental health issues have become a part of the national conversation. This was the motivation behind the first IHPC Youth Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training workshop for teens who want to better understand the issues, recognize the signs, and learn how to help friends or family who may be suffering. In fact, so many teens wanted to participate in the two-day course, that we had to offer a second date scheduled for later this summer. 

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Our partners at TriCity Wellness Center opened their doors to these students, teaching them the how to recognize the signs of mental illness and suicide and raised their awareness about the depth of the issue. Students were trained in the MHFA Action Plan called A.L.G.E.E. which stands for Assess (risk of suicide or harm), Listen (non-judgementally), Give (reassurance and information), Encourage (appropriate professional help), and Encourage (self help and other supports). Each student participated in scenarios which helped where they used the action plan to identify the issue and offer help and resources. 

Lora Illeg and Sally Sagario, represtatives from NAMI shared personal stories of mental health illness.

Lora Illeg and Sally Sagario, represtatives from NAMI shared personal stories of mental health illness.

There were several keynote speakers who offered the students a first-person perspective on living with and someone with mental illness. Lora Illig, from NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness, provided resources and locaiton to seek help. She talked about her own child who suffered with mental health illness and how this lead her to seek help from NAMI. She now works with NAMI to help other families like her own. 

Sally Sagario, part of NAMI's In Our Own Voice speaker's bureau also spoke to the students, this time from the perspective of her own mental health disorder. She told students how her symptoms began during high school and went unrecognized until she was in college. Though her family was very supportive and understanding, it was the assistance they received through NAMI that helped them through many ups and down. Despite the many challenges she went on to complete her education and leads a full life in recovery. Hearing directly and honestly from two people so closely affected by mental health illness really impacted the students and the message of hope and help hit home. 

This was a pretty heavy topic but the students, who had to be 16 years of age to participate, were very receptive, asked good questions, and received many resources from TriCity Mental Health, NAMI, and Reach Out on where they can find help for a teen contemplating suicide or showing signs of mental health illness. They also received a 3-year training certificate in Mental Health First Aid recognized by the National Council for Mental Health.  For youth 16 years and older who would like to attend the next training, please apply online. IHPC offers this free workshop FREE of charge to participants. Light snacks and beverages served.