IHPC takes a look back to inform the future. 

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The whirlwind of the holidays brought about something very special we want to share - our 10 year report. This comprehensive study was months in the making and many of you were asked to participate in an online survey to share your thoughts about the impact of IHPC on health workforce. This 100-page report took a deep look at how we started, what we've done well, and where we can focus improvements as we move into the second decade of our work. The good news is this - we are making a difference! 

But no one said it better than two very dynamic young ladies who have been participating in IHPC field experiences and site visits for the last year. Their testimonies truly reflected why this health workforce development work is so essential to our region. Michelle Onyiah, sophmore at Eleanor Roosevelt High School and Isabella Orozco, senior at Chino Hills High School captured the hearts and minds of our audience at the holiday quarterly meeting with their personal testimonies. 

If you are a high school student and do not know what to do after high school, or even if you do, you need to get involved with IHPC. They will truly open your eyes to other health professions. For the longest time I was in between engineering and the medical field. Then, as a freshmen I went to my first IHPC field trip - medical boot camp. I loved it!...I also got certified in mental health first aid, so now I can help my friends if I see mental health issues...Then I got to visit University of LaVerne to learn about multiple health professions. This [experience] I loved the most becuase I learned about biomedical engineering which has medical and engineering right there together! I was like, ‘score! I’m doing THAT when I get older.’
— Michelle Onyiah
Michelle's excitement lit up the room!

Michelle's excitement lit up the room!

Isabella stressed the idea that her experiences have helped her to realize that, while being a doctor or nurse is important, there are so many more ways to serve. 

There are experiences that I will never forget....there are so many opportunties that you’ve showed me....you are really are impacting my high school [experience]. There are kids that are saying ‘I’m going to go be a pharmacist.’ You don’t hear high school kids talk like that. Or ‘I’m going to go specialize in neonatology or go work for a biotech company and go into bioengineering’,  but those are the options IHPC is giving us.
— Isabella Orozco
Carol Allbaugh gives Isabella Orozco a giant hug for her moving testimony about IHPC's impact on her life. 

Carol Allbaugh gives Isabella Orozco a giant hug for her moving testimony about IHPC's impact on her life. 

 

These students, and hundreds of others like them, are our future workforce and we look forward to impacting all the "Michelle's" and "Isabella's" in our region who are looking for the opportunity to create their own pathway and serve our region. We hope that you, our partners, stakeholders, and supporters, stay with us on this journey. Download 10-year report and strategic plan

Students go to camp.

Students talk to one of Reach's air medics during a brief tour of the helicopter. 

Students talk to one of Reach's air medics during a brief tour of the helicopter. 

IHPC put on another Discovery Health Occupations Camp with the help of our partners at Mt. San Jacinto College-Menifee Campus. This was a great opportunity for high school students to learn about the nursing and allied health programs offered there. Students participated in several breakout sessions and learned about Fire Technology, 

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Registered Nursing, Certified Nursing Assistant, Emergency Medical Technician, and Diagnostic Medical Sonography careers. There were plenty of hands-on activities to go around as students learned proper patient transfer from bed to wheelchair, and how to take blood pressure, pulse, and temperature.  Wound care was also practiced, which received more than a few jokes as the students walked into to room full of "butts" lined up on tables with "wounds." It was explained to the students that wound care often starts with pressure points and bedridden patients can easily develop sores on, you guessed, their back ends. After the chuckles, students got down to the serious business of learning how to care and prevent these sores as medical students and instructors patiently showed them the steps. One of the many highlights of the day was when a gleaming red REACH Air helicopter landed on site and the students were allowed to climb onboard and talk to the air medics who were all too happy to share their passion for this type of health service, with the students. All in all, nearly 200 students and teachers from Elsinore, Citrus, Paloma, Heritage, West Valley, Tahquitz, Hemet, and Perris High Schools  participated in the two-day Discovery Health Occupations.

I think hands-on learning, is really important because that’s how it gonna be in the future for our careers and our jobs. Everything is really hands-on so it’s really important to get a heads on a start with that.
— N. Rangel, Junior at Tahquitz High School

We would like to thank Mt. San Jacinto College, and Reach Air Medical Services and their team for taking the time to educate our students on the emergency air services and let them tour one of their helicopters

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PS. Did you know that, according to Glassdoor, a REACH Air Medic pilot makes between $64,000 to $83,000 dollars a year? Hmmm...something to think about!

SBVC Nursing Day

Ayala HS students with SBVC nursing class. 

Ayala HS students with SBVC nursing class. 

San Bernardino Valley College nursing program hosted Inland Empire Job Corps Medical Assisting students and Ayala High School Pre-Med Society club members at their Nursing Day. Always such positive experience for potential stuents, the highschoolers spent the day alongside the graduating class which gave them the chance to ask questions and learn from peers just a few years older than themselves. Some of the questions included: what made you want to pursue nursing, what was your other career choice, how hard was it to get into the nursing program, and how is the course material compared to high school - all excellent questions and demonstrated that student's interest in the field. 

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Some of the activities included classroom presenations and activities like "Rethink Your Drink" (an activity that shows how much sugar you consume in your day-to-day drinks), the risks of texting and driving, a germ matching game (matching a picture with the correct germ count), and how to use a Doppler (medical device). The hands on activities took place in their sim lab with students practicing chest compressions, learning about different incisions, where to find pulses, and listening to a chest simulator with bronchitis. One student, Mark Alonzo, a junior at Ayala High School said, “The different activities they have us doing makes this site visit fun. I really enjoyed "Re-Think Your Drink" because I learned a lot and saw [how much] work each student put into it.” SBVC was equally impressed with the Ayala students: 

I just wanted to inform you how awesome the Ayala HS students were. This group of students definitely stood out as the best group we have ever had come through for the Nursing Outreach events. I was blown away with how knowledgeable and skilled they already are. They were professional, engaged and fun. Hands down, they rocked!! Huge props for the Educators preparing them for such a bright and rewarding future!!!!
— Rochelle Fender, MSN-Ed, RN Assistant Director/Faculty Chair/Nursing Faculty San Bernardino Valley College

A shout out to Rochelle and everyone at SBVC whose tremendous program is inspiring so many students to pursue the field of nursing!

Code blue throws students into action.

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Even though they were just dummies, students still felt some of the pressure that comes with responding to an emergency situation, as they role played during a field experience at the Kaiser School of Anesthesia in Pasadena. This was the first time the school had ever opened the doors of their training facility to high school students, and the hope was that, by introduding the field of nurse anesthetist to students before entering college, they can better prepare themselves academically.  

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The site visits occured November 7th and 8th, and gave several health pathway student groups a chance to hear presentations from faculty on critical care nursing, and practice tracheal intubation and other code blue emergency simulations. The students had a great time and the Kaiser staff really enjoyed teaching the younger generation about their field. 

 

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Dental camp offers a first time experience to students.

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Accomplished professor and dentist, Dr. Bradley Henson,  connected with a room full of teens recently during his talk at the dental camp put on by Western University of Health Sciences College of Dental Medicine. He struck a cord with the students by relaying a story from his own teenage years when he read a pamphlet on how to become a dentist, during a visit to his own dentist's office. The pamphlet, he explained, stressed the importance of maintaining a 3.5 GPA in school and he worked really, really hard to make sure he met that standard. He motivated and encouraged the students while speaking at a level and pace they could understand. His presentation ended with a slide entitled: YOU CAN DO IT!

Alex, El Roble Middle School works on alginate impressions and casting models.

Alex, El Roble Middle School works on alginate impressions and casting models.

Alex, an 8th grade student from El Roble Middle School, heard about the dental camp through his Native American organization site. This was his first time being exposed to the medical field. He wishes to be the first in his family to pursue a higher education and be successful. He shared with us how this experience has helped him to think more about what he wants to be in the future and that healthcare is an option for him. Alex said he would recommend this dental camp to his friends, as it was an enriching experience for him.

Melane, Simons Middle School, concentrates on the tooth in front of her during the prepare and restore workshop. 

Melane, Simons Middle School, concentrates on the tooth in front of her during the prepare and restore workshop. 

Melanie, a 7th grader from Simons Middle School, she shared how excited she was to have this type of hands-on experience. Melanie stayed really focused during the prepare and restore workshop. She smiled at alot and shared how much fun she was having doing the filling for the tooth. She is now seriously considering going into the field of dentistry!

While not every student who attended dental camp was certain about pursuing the field, the all agreed that the experience opened their eyes to the possibilities and the great food was a bonus! 

 

Student ambassadors show outstanding leadership.

IHPC 2017-18 Student Ambassadors.

IHPC 2017-18 Student Ambassadors.

The 2017-18 IHPC Student Ambassador cohort met before Christmas break in the President's conference room at SBVC to discuss outreach plans for introducing health careers in their respective schools and colleges. This year our cohort has grown to 11 students who have already shown exceptional leadership skills. Please meet a few of our ambassadors: 

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Meet Andrew Hoover, a senior at Ruben Ayala High School in Chino Hills, CA, and aspiring cardiovascular surgeon or family doctor. As the campus representative for his Ayala Pre-Medical Society, Andrew hopes to expose his peers to different careers within the medical field. The projects Andrew has already spearheaded this year are the Nursing Day site visit to San Bernardino Valley College (SBVC) and the American Medical Response (AMR) Toy Drive. On December 7, 2017, Andrew took 50 of his Ayala High School peers to SBVC to learn more about nursing careers, how to get into a nursing program, and what it takes to be both a successful nursing student and professional. 

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Meet Luzcamila Bonilla, a senior at Palomares Academy of Health Sciences in Pomona, CA, who is interested in pursuing a career in Veterinary Medicine. In addition to her rold as Student Ambassador, Luzcamila is also the Vice President of her Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) club; a nationally recognized student lead medical society. As an established HOSA chapter, members are in charge of scheduling and facilitating “HOSA Week” - a series of outreach activites to educate student bodies on health careers and conditions. As the HOSA Vice President and IHPC Student Ambassador, Luzcamila has taken on the challenge of establishing her school’s first ever Community Health Fair. This health fair is scheduled to take place in February and will conclude the “HOSA Week” festivities.    

Let’s give it up for these two WONDERFUL young people doing their part to serve their peers and community.

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Special thank you to Joan Murillo, Assistant Professor of Biology at SBVC, for providing our IHPC Student Ambassador meeting locations for the academic year.

PharmDay gives kids exposure to the field.

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Just before the holidays, a two-year collaboration between IHPC and the School of Pharmacy at Western University of Health Sciences, finally came to fruition. The project was called PharmDay and, unlike what it sounds like, did not involve any animals - smile. Instead, students interested in the field of pharmaceutical medicine would be treated to an immersive experience on the college's campus and increase their knowlege and understanding of the field. Several dozen high school students were selected to spend a day with current Pharmacy students, participate in a panel discussion Q & A , and break up into teams for some interactive learning. 

The morning started with a careers presentation facilitated by student pharmacist, Marvin Ortiz. Following his presentation the high school students asked questions about how to prep for Pharm School in college, what type of support they received from their families, and when did they realize they wanted to pursue Pharmacy. The panelist, Mary Abramyan, Aya Alwahib, Natasha Strother, Roland Davoudie, and Marvin Ortiz patiently answered their questions and then broke them up into teams for the second segment of the day.  

All of the students were first shown the fundamentals of taking and recording blood pressure. In a laboratory, led by Dr. Rudy Mireles, they learned the basics of compounding by making their own flavored lip balm to take home as a souvenir.  Before wrapping up the day, Jacqueline Javier, Manager of Early Assurance and Pathway Programs at WesternU College of Pharmacy led the students on a tour of the campus. Overall, both the pharmacy students and the high school students enjoyed their time together and thought of PharmDay as a great educational experience. Here is what a few of our students had to say about their experience: 

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"My favorite part of the day was making chap-stick, using the equipment in the lab, and working with chemicals. It was a unique experience that increased my interest in pharmacy and [she learned] what type of classes should be taken in college to be a competitive candidate for a Pharmacy Doctorate program.' - Isabella Orozco, junior at CHHS

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When asked about which speaker was his favorite Alejandro Becerril, senior at Montclair High School, said he “… enjoyed Marvin Ortiz the most because I felt like I could relate with him more because of his background. It makes him a role model in a sense and makes me want to work as hard as he did to be where I want to be.”

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This group of students is bright, motivated, and eager to learn. PharmDay will play a big role in the student’s education moving forward. It was great for them to get exposure early, even for the students who don’t have an interest in careers in Pharmacy.” - Mary Abramyan, first year PharmD student at WU College of Pharmacy

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Dr. Rudy Mireles shared that the medical field is in great hands in the upcoming generations. The student’s ability to listen and follow directions will go a long way in their education and in their careers.

The Inland Health Professions Coalition would like to thank Jacqueline Javier for spearheading this project and all of WesternU College of Pharmacy students, staff, and faculty for hosting such a unique event for the students in our community. 

Huge turnout for first ever Health Professions "Parent Night".

Former participant, Julio guzman shares his LIFE experience. He is from Montclair High. 

Former participant, Julio guzman shares his LIFE experience. He is from Montclair High. 

In our first ever "Parent Night" more than 80 parents showed up to learn more about what they hear their kids talking about - IHPC!  The meeting was held at the Alta Loma High School where students and their families were invited to hear about the many programs that IHPC facilitates, and meet some of our community partners who offer student site visits and job shadow experiences. We were happy that so many of the Chaffey Joint Union High School District parents were able to attend and have dinner on us! 

The parents had a lot of great questions and really appreciated the information we provided them. They also heard from former participants who gave a student perspective on the benefits of participating in IHPC opportunties. We provided flyers and brochures on upcoming events as well as general information on IHPC. Students in attendance were able to pre-sign up for upcoming programs as well.  We look forward to hosting future Parent Nights in other districts in the year to come. 

Thank you to Alta Loma High for hosting the evening and our guest speakers, Henry Vasquez, clinical Education Specialist from AMR, and Jacqueline Javier, Manager of Early Assurance and Pathway Programs, from Western University School of Pharmacy. #AltaLomaHigh #ParentNight #IHPC #CJUHSD #WesternU #AMR

Toy Drive fills an ambulance!

[L to R] EMT's Travon McMillan and Shalon Watkins unloading toys at Reach Out offices. 

[L to R] EMT's Travon McMillan and Shalon Watkins unloading toys at Reach Out offices. 

An armload of gift cards for our teens!

An armload of gift cards for our teens!

American Medical Response (AMR) is delivering a different kind of care this holiday as it visited seven area schools to pick up toys that will be donated to families needing a little extra cheer this Christmas. In partnership with IHPC, AMR has again generously donated their time, crew, and an ambulance to  pick up and deliver more than 400 toys to the Reach Out offices in Upland, this afternoon. Everyone felt a little like St. Nick as toys were loaded onto wagons and taken upstairs to be sorted and wrapped according to age and gender. AMR also raised more than $500 in gift cards for the older kids. How did they do it (we hope they don't mind us sharing)? Jeans Day! AMR staff were allowed to wear jeans to work on Fridays if they donated a $10 gift card to the toy drive - genious! Maybe this incentive will catch on in offices everywhere! 

The AMR crew will be back again next Monday to help wrap the gifts, and then return for the Reach Out Holiday Posada on Wednesday where the gifts will be handed out by Santa.  They will even bring an ambulance so kids will have a chance to climb on board and ask questions - another popular attraction of the evening. 

Travon McMillan greets students as they bring cartloads of toys out to the the ambulance. 

Travon McMillan greets students as they bring cartloads of toys out to the the ambulance. 

We want to think Shalon Watkins and Travon McMillan for going from school to school, thanking the many health pathway students who facilitated the toy drive at their respective schools. AMR gives from the heart and just knowing that deserving families will have Christmas this year is  thanks enough for them. We are honored to work with such dedicated community partners! 

*About the Posada: Every year, Reach Out invites our partners and all of the families we serve, to a holiday posada where each child receives a special wrapped gift from Santa (and pinky swear that they've been nothing but "nice" all year long!). It is the highlight of an evening filled with food, hot drinks, music and plenty of good cheer to go around. This year we will open our doors and welcome nearly 600 moms, dads, and kids! For more information, please contact Reach Out at 909-982-8641. 

#AMR #GivingBack #ReachOutPosada #FilltheAmbulance #ToyDrive #IHPC

 

 

Get Psyched! comes to the west end.

Future mental health professionals? We think so! Front row: Patricia Chan, Jenmarie Eadie, and CHHS counselor, Melissa Hughes. 

Future mental health professionals? We think so! Front row: Patricia Chan, Jenmarie Eadie, and CHHS counselor, Melissa Hughes. 

The Get Psyched! program has been making its debut across both counties, impacting hundreds of students interested in mental health careers and training. As with every group, active participation and training exercises help break down the stigma often associated with mental illness while helping students see the subject through the eyes of the practioner. This training was facilitated by three wonderful practioners, Lora Illig, Executive Director at NAMI (National Alliance of Mental Illness), Patricia Chan, founder of LiveWell Therapy in Chino Hills, and Jenmarie Eadie, founder of Jeanmarie Eadie LCSW, Inc. in Upland. In order to keep the training effective and facilitate engagement, only 50 students were able to attend this four-hour weekend program held at Chino Hills High School. 

Lora Illig, from NAMI shares personal story.

Lora Illig, from NAMI shares personal story.

Ms. Illig served as the keynote speaker and opened the day by sharing her personal testimony of how mental illness in her own family eventually drove her involvement with NAMI. She talked a lot about how NAMI seeks to break down the stigmas associated with mental and behavioral health and encouraged the students to not be afraid or ashamed to seek out a therapist or counselor, pointing out that we all have stuff that weighs on our minds and talking about it with trained professional isn't a bad thing. 

One student shares her best Get Psyched! moments. 

One student shares her best Get Psyched! moments. 

  • The breakout session facilitators were Chan and Eadie who divided the students in half in order to tackle some more specific fields of practice. Chan talked about the signs and symptoms of behavioral health issues among teens and how to cope with it. Students also got to work through a case study and take on the role of a LCSW (licensed clinical social worker).  In the other room Eadie's students learned how a LCSW works with children. She engaged them in the many techniques used by therapist to help kids open up while at the same time, observing their behavior. She brought along several tools of the trade - toys and coloring books that she uses to assist her as she works with children who have a difficult time expressing their feelings. One student, Eden, from Chino Hills really found the seminar eye opening. The idea that children could be encouraged to share their feelings in a clinical setting using toys and coloring books was a whole new concept. She said that she also enjoyed the group case study they worked on. 

Another successful Get Psyched! and we hope that students left with a better understanding of the field and desire to pursue a career in mental health. Thank you to all of our presenters for their time and ongoing support of the Get Psyched! program.